Events

Sponsored Presentations
2019-2020 event Series
CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Sandra Springer – June 9, 2020
Tuesday, June 9, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Sandra Springer, MD
Presentation title: Integration of Opioid Use Disorder and Infectious Disease Prevention and Treatment: Not Only Smart but the Right Thing to Do!

Sandra Springer will review the national statistics of opioid epidemic and other stimulant epidemics in the United States fueling new HIV/ HCV and bacterial infection epidemics across the country. She will discuss effect of medication treatment of Opioid use disorder (OUD) on improving not only opioid use but also HIV and HCV treatment and prevention. Additionally, she will review the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine’s recent recommendations to integrate OUD and infectious disease prevention and treatment.

Sandra SpringerSandra Springer, MD, is an associate professor of medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases (ID) at the Yale School of Medicine. She is also the Director of the ID Clinic at the Newington site and an attending ID physician at the West Haven site of the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. She is board-certified in internal medicine, ID, and addiction medicine. She has significant clinical and research experience with use of medications for the treatment of opioid (OUD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) among persons living with HIV, persons in the criminal justice system (CJS), and persons in the community in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

She has evaluated the effectiveness of buprenorphine (BUP) to reduce opioid relapse and improve HIV viral suppression in persons released from prison and jail with OUD and HIV. She has conducted RCTs and evaluated the impact of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) as a PI for NIAAA and NIDA funded studies among persons in the CJS with HIV and AUD and OUD. She currently is co-leading two NIDA-funded studies evaluating the impact of MOUD on immunobiological outcomes; and on HIV latency and persistence among persons with OUD and HIV. She is also co-PI on 3 other large RCTs including a large VA COOP grant evaluating injectable buprenorphine compared to SL buprenorphine among Veterans with OUD; a NIDA JCOIN grant comparing XR-NTX to injectable BUP for persons in the CJS; and an NCATS grant to evaluate long-acting BUP and integrated ID treatment in persons within the hospital.

She is an appointed National Academy of Science committee member that evaluated community programs nationally that integrated OUD and ID treatment; a current member of ASAM’s National Practice Guideline Expert Panel for Medication Treatment for OUD; and current a member of the IDSA and HIVMA Working Group on addressing ID issues in the opioid epidemic. She has presented her work at numerous national and international conferences, and has published over 100 manuscripts, book chapters and abstracts regarding the subject of HIV, CJS and SUDs.

CDUHR Pilot Project Awards Program Information Session – September 3, 2019
Tuesday, September 3, 2019, 11:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: Online Webinar
Presented by: Vincent Guilamo-Ramos & Holly Hagan
Presentation title: CDUHR Pilot Project Awards Program Information Session

This webinar will help applicants to plan and strategize for a successful pilot proposal. The session will highlight the pilot application process and timeline, answer questions, and end with a discussion of how proposals may fit with the Center’s research mission to address HIV, HCV, and substance use. Awards of up to $25,000 will be funded to support one-year projects addressing emerging research questions.

Vincent Guilamo-RamosVincent Guilamo-Ramos is a professor and Associate Vice Provost of Mentoring and Outreach Programs at New York University (NYU). He is the director and founder of the Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos also serves as the Pilot and Mentoring Core Director at the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research at the NYU College of Global Public Health. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos is a clinical social worker and nurse practitioner, and is board certified in HIV/AIDS nursing (ACRN) and as a HIV specialist (AAHIVS). Clinically, he has expertise in the primary care of HIV positive adolescents, provision of pre-exposure prophylaxis for high-risk youths, and screening and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos studies the role of families in promoting adolescent health, with a special focus on preventing HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, unplanned pregnancies, and improving treatment outcomes for HIV positive and at-risk youth. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. He serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the Latino Commission on AIDS, and is a board member of the Power to Decide. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos received his PhD from SUNY Albany, and his MSW and MPH degrees from NYU. In addition, he holds an MS from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at NYU and an MSN from the Duke University School of Nursing.

Holly HaganHolly Hagan trained as an infectious disease epidemiologist with an emphasis on methods to study disease causation and control. Her research has addressed the etiology, epidemiology, natural history, prevention and treatment of blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections in key populations in general and among people who use drugs (PWUD) in particular. She is skilled in research synthesis (systematic reviews and meta-analyses) and the methods of implementation science. She has designed and led a number of large observational and experimental studies related to blood-borne viral infections in PWUD, men who have sex with men (MSM), and heterosexuals at high risk of HIV. Dr. Hagan is a member of the WHO Global Burden of Disease Study Diseases and Injuries Group, she served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis in the United States, and have been an advisor to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC, and the Canadian Institutes of Health on national programs to detect, diagnose and treat HCV infections.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Victoria Frye – September 10, 2019
Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Victoria Frye, DrPH
Presentation title: TRUST: A Friend-based Intervention to Increase Consistent HIV Self-testing among Black or African-American, Gay, Bisexual and Other MSM and Transgender Women

Dr. Frye will describe the design and preliminary results of TRUST, a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to support consistent HIV self-testing among Black or African-American MSM and transgender women. TRUST randomized friend pairs to either a brief behavioral intervention, where they learned how to HIV self-test, enhanced peer support for testing and linkage to care, and increased motivation and developed plans for consistent testing (every three months), or a control condition, where they learned about self-screening for a range of common health conditions.  This talk will describe the original vision for the intervention, changes made along the way in the study design and preliminary results of impact of the intervention on HIV self-testing at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-intervention.

Victoria FryeVictoria Frye is an Associate Medical Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine of the CUNY School of Medicine (CSOM). She received her BA (History), MPH (Epidemiology) and DrPH (Sociomedical Sciences) from Columbia University. Dr. Frye is currently the Principal Investigator of two HIV prevention studies funded by the NIH. PEPTALK (R21 AI-122996) is a study to design and evaluate a media campaign to increase demand for post-exposure HIV prophylaxis (PEP), among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). TRUST (R01 DA-038108) is a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) to test a peer-based behavioral intervention to increase consistent HIV self-testing among African-American or Black MSM and transgender women.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Eli Rosenberg – October 8, 2019
Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Eli Rosenberg, PhD
Presentation title: HCV/HIV Prevalence, Risk, and Care among Persons Who Inject Drugs in Upstate New York

Dr. Rosenberg will review recent work to describe the epidemiology of HCV infection in New York State, centered on the New York Hepatitis C Elimination Initiative. He will discuss emerging findings from the Upstate PWID Study for Infectious Disease Elimination (UPSIDE), an HCV/HIV bio-behavioral survey of persons who inject drugs in 3 upstate New York communities, and implications for future research and surveillance activities.

Eli RosenbergEli Rosenberg, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University at Albany School of Public Health, SUNY.  His research centers on applied and analytic epidemiologic studies that address current public health challenges in HIV, STI, and viral hepatitis surveillance, prevention, and social determinants, with a focus on persons who inject drugs and men who have sex with men.

Health Economics Training – Jake Morgan – October 24, 2019
Thursday, October 24, 2019, 10:00 am-1:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Jake Morgan, PhD
Presentation title: Expanding the Impact of Substance Use Disorder Research: Economic Analysis for Program and Policy Evaluation

Registration is Closed.

This overview training is for researchers who wish to improve their understanding of economic analysis such that you can attend conference presentations or read peer-reviewed articles and comfortably interpret overall conclusions. This training will provide an overview, application, and interpretation of health economics techniques—including cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis—and will use examples from the literature related to HIV, HCV, and substance use disorder.

This training is supported by The Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorder, HCV, and HIV (CHERISH: P30DA040500), a NIDA-funded National Center of Excellence.

Jake MorganJake Morgan is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Law, Policy, and Management at the Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Morgan is an applied health economist with extensive experience in statistical, econometric, and simulation modeling approaches. He has a history of collaborating with public health stakeholders and excels at leveraging real-world big data to answer pressing public health questions. Dr. Morgan is an investigator in CHERISH’s HCV and HIV Core has worked with CHERISH since its inception.

Grant Development Workshop 1: Fruitful Areas for Research – October 29, 2019
Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Holly Hagan, PhD & Sam Friedman, PhD
Presentation title: Fruitful Areas of Funding for Research on HIV, HCV and Other Health Issues among Drug Using Populations

Holly Hagan and Sam Friedman will discuss promising areas for funding of research on HIV and HCV among people who use drugs. They will review the NIH strategic plan for HIV-related research, as well as NIDA’s funding priorities. They will also discuss investigator-initiated research that blends and expands the priorities.

We encourage participants to send their research ideas in advance to CDUHR@nyu.edu. Drs. Hagan and Friedman will provide feedback on these ideas at the workshop. Participants may also bring their ideas to the workshop.

Holly HaganHolly Hagan is the director of CDUHR. She is trained as an infectious disease epidemiologist with an emphasis on methods to study disease causation and control. Dr. Hagan is an internationally-recognized expert in the etiology, epidemiology, natural history, prevention and treatment of hepatitis C virus infection among people who use drugs, and in 2014 her work was recognized by the US Department of Health and Human Services with the President’s Award for Leadership in the Control of Viral Hepatitis in the United States. Dr. Hagan served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis in the United States, and she has been an advisor to the US Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC, and the Canadian Institutes of Health on national programs to detect, diagnose and treat HCV infections. She was selected by NIDA to chair the Executive Steering Committee for the Rural Opioid Initiative funded by NIH, CDC, SAMHSA and the Appalachian Regional Commission. She was recently appointed to the National Academy of Medicine Committee on the Examination of the Integration of Opioid and Infectious Disease Prevention Efforts in Select Programs.

Sam FriedmanSam Friedman is an associate director of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Theory Core. Dr. Friedman has worked on research concerning people who use drugs and HIV since 1983. He has written widely on related epidemiology and prevention topics. His work has contributed substantially to what we know about drug users’ social networks and their relations to HIV epidemics; to our understanding of macro-social epidemiology of drug use and its associated diseases; to the theory and practice of drug users’ organizations and their efforts to reduce the spread of HIV and other infections among them; to efforts to prevent HIV transmission by drug users and others who have recently become infected; and to our understanding of how HIV and other epidemics among people who used drugs do or do not spread to non-users in their communities.

Chatty Wednesday Research Forum Series – October 30, 2019
Wednesday, October 30, 2019, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Location: 665 Broadway, Room 1111
Presented by: Ellen Benoit, PhD & Ian Aronson, PhD
Presentation title: Giving Men a Voice (GMaV) & Revisiting Data to Ask New Questions

Giving Men a Voice (GMaV)

Principal Investigators:  Ellen Benoit & Martin Downing

GMaV is a mixed-methods study funded by the NICHD with Black and Latino gay and bisexual men in New York City (N=61) that implemented a trauma-informed approach to assessing formative sexual experiences in childhood (before age 16) with older male and female partners. We also conducted in-depth interviews with 35 service providers in the New York City area, mostly in substance abuse treatment, HIV prevention and treatment and mental health care. Those interviews focused primarily on preparedness to incorporate sexual history and issues of sexuality into treatment or counseling. I will present some of the main findings from the study and briefly describe our plans for the next phase in our research.

Ellen BenoitEllen Benoit is a sociologist at North Jersey Community Research Initiative in Newark, NJ. She conducts NIH-funded qualitative and mixed-methods research on health inequality, particularly as it relates to HIV risk and substance use among marginalized groups. With Dr. Liliane Windsor at the University of Illinois, she is a Principal Investigator on a study in Newark using community based participatory research methods and multiphase optimization strategy to test an intervention designed to reduce substance use among formerly incarcerated men.  Dr. Benoit is currently a Principal Investigator with Dr. Eric Schrimshaw of the University of Central Florida on a study using sexual script theory to understand the process of sexual socialization and risk behavior in a diverse sample of young men who have sex with men. With Dr. Martin Downing of Lehman College, she is investigating the impact of childhood sexual abuse on adult substance use, health and mental health outcomes among Black and Latino gay and bisexual men. Dr. Benoit is an Associate Director in CDUHR’s Transdisciplinary Research Methods Core.

Revisiting Data to Ask New Questions

Long after study data have been thoroughly examined for primary and exploratory outcomes, existing yet unpublished data may provide valuable opportunities to examine new questions. For example, new findings in an investigator’s own line of research, or in the larger field, may suggest additional directions for data analysis. In this presentation, Dr. Aronson will discuss how analyzing a series of datasets led to new findings about significant relationships between reporting substance use and accepting an HIV test following a computer-based intervention.

Ian AronsonIan David Aronson is a Principal Investigator and Associate Research Scientist in the College of Global Public Health at NYU. He studies how technology-based behavioral health interventions can be developed for clinical and community settings.

Stigma Symposium – November 12, 2019
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 9:00 am-2:00 pm
Location: 60 Washington Square South, Room 802
Presented by: Valerie Earnshaw, PhD; Karsten Lunze, MD, MPH, DrPH; Lawrence Yang, PhD; Holly Catania, JD & Erica Basco, MPH, and others
Presentation title: Stigma Toward People Who Use Drugs, the Oppressed and the Marginalized: Innovations and Updates in Theory, Methods, Research, and Practice

Innovations in Stigma Measurement
Valerie Earnshaw, PhD – University of Delaware

Addressing Intersectional Stigma Affecting HIV Key Populations
Karsten Lunze, MD, MPH, DrPH – Boston University School of Medicine

Self-Stigma and Identification and Treatment for Opioid Use and Other Substance Use Disorders: Advances in an Emerging Field
Lawrence Yang, PhD – NYU College of Global Public Health

‘I am Living Proof that Buprenorphine and Methadone Work’: A Public Health Campaign and Evaluation
Holly Catania, JD & Erica Basco, MPH – NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Panel of researchers with lived experience of stigma
Derek Dangerfield II, PhD – Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
David Frank, PhD – NYU Meyers College of Nursing
Letitia McBride – North Jersey Community Research Initiative
Moderator: Alexandra Harocopos, PhD – NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Brief Introduction to MOST – Linda Collins – November 18, 2019
Monday, November 18, 2019, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Linda M. Collins, PhD
Presentation title: A Brief Introduction to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST)
This presentation will introduce the three phases of MOST: preparation, optimization, and evaluation.  Emphasis will be on the preparation and optimization phases.  A short group exercise will give attendees the opportunity to design an optimization trial.

Linda CollinsLinda M. Collins is the director of The Methodology Center, a P50 center funded by NIDA, and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Collins’ primary research interest is optimization of behavioral, biobehavioral, and biomedical interventions using MOST. MOST enables researchers to develop interventions that are not only effective, but also efficient, economical, and scalable.
Research Forum – Puerto Ricans Who Use Drugs – November 19, 2019
Tuesday, November 19, 2019, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Carlos Rodriguez-Díaz, PhD; Yesenia Aponte-Meléndez, PhD(c); Vincent-Guilamo-Ramos, PhD; Camila Gelpi-Acosta, PhD
Presentation title: Research with Puerto Ricans Who Use Drugs in Puerto Rico and in New York City

Join us for this special morning of presentations focused on current research among Puerto Ricans who use drugs in Puerto Rico and NYC. Sherry Deren will initiate the day with a few words.

Colonialism in Times of Climate Change: Tales of HIV Prevention and Care among Puerto Ricans
Carlos Rodríguez-Díaz, PhD, MPHE, MCHES – The George Washington University

Crises Mode: Drug Use in Puerto Rico
Yesenia Aponte-Meléndez – PhD (c), Co-founder of a Puerto Rico-based syringe services program “El Punto en la Montaña”

Designing Family Based Sexual Risk Reduction Interventions for Puerto Rican and Dominican Youth
Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, PhD, MPH, RN, LCSW, ANP-BC, AAHIVS – NYU Silver School of Social Work

Puerto Rican PWID in the Bronx: The Crises that Persist
Camila Gelpí-Acosta, PhD – LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

Grant Development Workshop 2: Specific Aims, Significance, Innovation – November 25, 2019
Monday, November 25, 2019, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Vincent Guilamo-Ramos & Ellen Benoit
Presentation title: CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 2: Specific Aims, Significance, Innovation

Drs. Vincent Guilamo-Ramos and Ellen Benoit will focus on developing specific aims, significance and innovation for an NIH application. In addition, two early stage investigators will present on the specific aims from their NIH grant proposals for feedback and discussion.

Vincent Guilamo-RamosVincent Guilamo-Ramos is a professor and Associate Vice Provost of Mentoring and Outreach Programs at New York University (NYU). He is the director and founder of the Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos also serves as the Pilot and Mentoring Core Director at the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research at the NYU College of Global Public Health. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos is a clinical social worker and nurse practitioner, and is board certified in HIV/AIDS nursing (ACRN) and as a HIV specialist (AAHIVS). Clinically, he has expertise in the primary care of HIV positive adolescents, provision of pre-exposure prophylaxis for high-risk youths, and screening and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos studies the role of families in promoting adolescent health, with a special focus on preventing HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, unplanned pregnancies, and improving treatment outcomes for HIV positive and at-risk youth. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. He serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the Latino Commission on AIDS, and is a board member of the Power to Decide. Dr. Guilamo-Ramos received his PhD from SUNY Albany, and his MSW and MPH degrees from NYU. In addition, he holds an MS from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at NYU and an MSN from the Duke University School of Nursing.

Ellen BenoitEllen Benoit is a sociologist at North Jersey Community Research Initiative in Newark, NJ. She conducts NIH-funded qualitative and mixed-methods research on health inequality, particularly as it relates to HIV risk and substance use among marginalized groups. With Dr. Liliane Windsor at the University of Illinois, she is a Principal Investigator on a study in Newark using community based participatory research methods and multiphase optimization strategy to test an intervention designed to reduce substance use among formerly incarcerated men.  Dr. Benoit is currently a Principal Investigator with Dr. Eric Schrimshaw of the University of Central Florida on a study using sexual script theory to understand the process of sexual socialization and risk behavior in a diverse sample of young men who have sex with men. With Dr. Martin Downing of Lehman College, she is investigating the impact of childhood sexual abuse on adult substance use, health and mental health outcomes among Black and Latino gay and bisexual men. Dr. Benoit is an Associate Director in CDUHR’s Transdisciplinary Research Methods Core.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Aaron D. Fox – December 10, 2019
Tuesday, December 10, 2019, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Aaron Fox, MD
Presentation title: The Bronx Transitions Clinic: Patient-centered Medical Care for People with Criminal Justice-Involvement

Dr. Fox will describe the Bronx Transitions Clinic, which is an innovative program providing primary care, HIV care, and opioid use disorder treatment to people with criminal justice-involvement. The presentation will highlight key factors that disrupt medical care following release from incarceration and strategies for improving linkage and retention in medical care post-release. Solitary confinement, criminal justice stigma, and other important topics will also be discussed in detail.

Aaron D. FoxAaron Fox is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center. He is a primary care physician with board certification in addiction medicine and training in clinical research methods. Dr. Fox is the Co-Director of the Bronx Transitions Clinic, which provides a medical home to individuals who have recently been released from jail or prison. His research has included funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, New York State AIDS Institute, and Society of General Internal Medicine. These studies have focused on treatment of opioid use disorder, HIV, and chronic hepatitis C among formerly incarcerated individuals. Dr. Fox is working to develop behavioral interventions to complement pharmacotherapy for opioid use disorder and to improve linkage to care following release from incarceration.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Robin Pollini – January 14, 2020
Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Robin Pollini, PhD, MPH
Presentation title: Injection Drug Use in Rural Communities: The View From West Virginia

This presentation will provide an overview of injection drug use and its health impacts in rural areas, including a discussion of the factors unique to rural areas that pose challenges for delivery of both prevention and treatment services.

Robin PolliniRobin A. Pollini, PhD MPH is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry and Epidemiology at West Virginia University. For almost 20 years, Dr. Pollini has been involved in community-based research focused on injection drug use, injection-related health impacts, and health services provision for people who use drugs, with a focus on rural communities. She has led and collaborated on studies funded by the NIH and other funders at a wide range of sites including New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maryland, West Virginia, California, and Tijuana, Mexico. Most of her research focuses on how people who use drugs interact with societal structures and how these interactions impact health and decision making. Dr. Pollini holds a BSFS from Georgetown University and MPH and PhD degrees from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

 

Chatty Wednesday Research Forum Series – January 22, 2020
Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Location: 665 Broadway, Room 1111
Presented by: Honoria Guarino, PhD & Ethan Cowan, MD, MS
Presentation title: Characterizing the OUD Care Continuum Among Young People Who Inject Opioids in New York City & Impact of Universal Non-Targeted Hepatitis C Screening in an Urban Emergency Department

Chatty Wednesday is an opportunity to learn some of the research endeavors CDUHR-affiliated investigators are working on. Each quarter, two CDUHR-affiliated investigators will present on the status of a current research project, such as protocol development, enrollment successes, and the latest findings.

Guarino-276x303Characterizing the OUD Care Continuum Among Young People Who Inject Opioids in New York City
Honoria Guarino, PhD

This presentation will use baseline data from an ongoing clinical trial with a community-recruited sample of young people who inject drugs (PWID) in New York City to characterize key outcomes related to the opioid use disorder (OUD) care continuum in this population. Results highlight concerning gaps for young injectors at later stages of the OUD care continuum – specifically, retention/adherence to Opioid Agonist Therapy (OAT), particularly buprenorphine – and suggest that barriers are impeding their consistent use of OAT. Results also suggest a need to start OAT earlier in young people’s opioid use trajectories and to increase use of OAT as a first-line treatment.

Honoria Guarino is a Research Associate Professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Dr. Guarino is an anthropologist who specializes in mixed-methods, qualitative and ethnographic research on drug use and HIV/HCV infection. Her work focuses on the influence of multi-level contextual factors on vulnerability and resilience to the negative health impacts of drug use, and the development and evaluation of behavioral interventions, especially technology-based interventions, for people who use drugs and those vulnerable to HIV/HCV. Dr. Guarino has served as Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on numerous federally-funded studies with a broad range of drug-using populations, including young adults who use opioids and people who inject drugs, as well as immigrants from the former Soviet Union, migrant Puerto Ricans in New York City and opioid-treated chronic pain patients.

Ethan CowanImpact of Universal Non-Targeted Hepatitis C Screening in an Urban Emergency Department
Ethan Cowan, MD, MS

This presentation will highlight how high-volume non-targeted ED based HCV screening can identify a large number of individuals with undiagnosed HCV infection. Conversely, the data will demonstrate how screening based on current CDC guidelines, at least in EDs with high HCV prevalence, could miss a significant number of existing HCV infections.

Ethan Cowan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Icahn Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  For the last 15 years, Dr. Cowan has used his formal training in clinical research methods to coordinate and conduct randomized controlled trials and cohort studies in the Emergency Department (ED). His focus area is the design, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions in the ED. In the area of public health, Dr. Cowan has developed programs for HIV, HCV and STI screening in non-traditional settings.  Dr. Cowan’s work in public health has resulted in strong community partnerships with outpatient primary care physicians, specialists in infectious disease, addiction medicine and hepatitis C.  Dr. Cowan has strong working relationships with the New York City and New York State Departments of Health; the AIDS Institute Clinical Education Initiative and community partners such as the Latino Commission on AIDS.

CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 3: Integrating Conceptual Models and Theories – February 3, 2020
Monday, February 3, 2020, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Noelle Leonard, PhD & Donna Shelley, MD, MPH
Presentation title: CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 3: Integrating Conceptual Models and Theories

Theory serves as the structure and support for all aspects of your grant proposal and a clearly articulated theoretical framework significantly strengthens your application. Using examples of individual, interpersonal, and social level theories, and a case study of implementation science theory, this presentation will focus the ways in which theory serves as a guide for the design of your study as well as tips for integrating your theoretical model into the components of an NIH application.

In addition, two early stage investigators will present on the conceptual models and theories from their NIH grant proposals for feedback and discussion.

Noelle LeonardNoelle Leonard is a Senior Research Scientist at the NYU Silver School of Social Work and an Associate Director in the Transdisciplinary Research Methods (TRM) Core. Her expertise is in designing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating behavioral interventions for highly vulnerable adults, adolescents, and families including those who are infected with, or at-risk for, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, as well as those at risk for or dealing with issues related to substance use, and other mental health and behavioral problems. She has been a principal investigator or co-investigator on NIH-funded research studies using a variety of intervention strategies including mobile health, ambulatory assessment of physiological states, and mindfulness meditation. These studies have involved incarcerated youth, young men who have sex with men (YMSM), runaway/homeless youth, high-risk and HIV-infected adults, and at-risk adolescent mothers.

In her role on the TRM core, she assists CDUHR affiliated investigators who are planning or conducting intervention studies and participates in several activities of the Pilot Projects and Mentoring core including serving as a mentor for junior investigators who are developing and conducting CDUHR-funded pilot projects. She developed the CDUHR assessment measures database and is the point person for investigators who are searching for appropriate measures for developing grant proposals and conducting funded projects.

Donna ShelleyDonna Shelley is a faculty member in the New York University School of Global Public Health and has faculty appointments in the NYU Colleges of Dentistry and Nursing. Her research, cited in the 2008 PHS Guideline on Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence, has been funded by AHRQ, NIH, and CDC among others and is focused in the areas of tobacco control policy research, implementation science with a specific focus on studying health care system change to improve the quality of tobacco use treatment across a wide range of health care settings and developing efficacious cessation treatments for underserved populations, including smokers with comorbid conditions.

Stimulant Symposium – February 11, 2020
Tuesday, February 11, 2020, 9:00 am-2:00 pm
Location: 60 Washington Square South, Room 802
Presented by: Richard Rawson, PhD; Ricky Bluthenthal, PhD; Adam Carrico, PhD; Christian Grov, PhD, MPH
Presentation title: Snowblind: What are We Missing About Stimulants?

There is growing concern about the use and consequences of stimulant use. Recently, researchers found that both cocaine- and psychostimulant-involved non-fatal overdose deaths with and without an opioid increased between 2006 and 2016. Moreover, in some settings, cocaine and other stimulants have been implicated in outbreaks of HIV among people who inject drugs. Join us for this half-day symposium with leading experts to examine the current state of the epidemiology of stimulant use as well as the current state of stimulant treatment, HIV and HCV risk among people who use stimulants, and implications for the HIV prevent and treatment.

Speakers

Treatment of Individuals with Stimulant Use Disorders
Richard Rawson, PhD – University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine

Stimulant Use Among People Who Inject Drugs in Los Angeles and San Francisco: Epidemics, Responses, and Missed Opportunities Over the Decades
Ricky Bluthenthal, PhD – University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

Running with Scissors: Stimulant Use and Viral Suppression in the Era of HIV Treatment as Prevention
Adam Carrico, PhD – University of Miami

The Role of Persistent Methamphetamine Use in Stagnating HIV Prevention Among Men, Trans Women, and Trans Men Who Have Sex with Men
Christian Grov, PhD, MPH – CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 4: Research Design and Methods – February 24, 2020
Monday, February 24, 2020, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Chuck Cleland, PhD & Maria Khan, PhD, MPH
Presentation title: CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 4: Research Design and Methods

Drs. Chuck Cleland and Maria Khan will discuss how to effectively develop the research methods section of an NIH application, and define appropriate design and methods that are consistent with the scope for developmental and exploratory research studies. In addition, two early stage investigators will present on the research design and methods from their NIH grant proposals for feedback and discussion.

Chuck ClelandChuck Cleland is a quantitative psychologist and biostatistician with more than ten years of experience in the field of public health research. His methodological interests include longitudinal data analysis, meta-analysis, respondent-driven sampling, and multilevel modeling. His substantive research interests include health disparities, particularly in the areas of substance use and infectious disease.

Maria KhanMaria Khan is an epidemiologist who studies social determinants of STI/HIV-related drug and sex risk in vulnerable populations, who has considerable expertise measuring the influence of criminal justice involvement on STI/HIV risk. She developed a conceptual model that describes the likely pathways through which criminal justice involvement acts as a structural determinant of STI/HIV transmission; her funded studies have focused on testing this model in diverse populations. Her current NIDA-funded R01, “Stop-and-Frisk, Arrest, and Incarceration and STI/HIV Risk in Minority MSM,” aims to measure the effects of aggressive policing and incarceration on psychosocial vulnerability, mental health, stigma, and access to healthcare, and in turn STI/HIV risk among minority men who have sex with men (MSM). She also is funded to evaluate the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Health Justice Network (HJN), a trauma-informed program aiming to improve the health and well-being of justice-involved populations reentering their communities after release from jail and prison. Her prior studies have measured the influence of childhood traumas on criminal justice involvement and STI/HIV risk, and she has worked for years conducting STI/HIV prevention studies in international settings.

CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 5: Data Analytical Strategies – March 9, 2020
Monday, March 9, 2020, 10:00 am-12:00 pm
Location: 715 Broadway, Room 1221
Presented by: Chuck Cleland, PhD & Ellen Benoit, PhD
Presentation title: Data Analytical Strategies

Registration is Required.

Drs. Chuck Clelend and Ellen Benoit will discuss the development of quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods analytic strategies for an NIH application. In addition, two early stage investigators will present on the data analyses plans from their NIH grant proposals for feedback and discussion.

Chuck ClelandChuck Cleland is a quantitative psychologist and biostatistician with more than ten years of experience in the field of public health research. His methodological interests include longitudinal data analysis, meta­-analysis, respondent­ driven sampling, and multilevel modeling. His substantive research interests include health disparities, particularly in the areas of substance use and infectious disease.

 

Ellen BenoitEllen Benoit is a sociologist at North Jersey Community Research Initiative in Newark, NJ. She conducts NIH-funded qualitative and mixed-methods research on health inequality, particularly as it relates to HIV risk and substance use among marginalized groups. With Dr. Liliane Windsor at the University of Illinois, she is a Principal Investigator on a study in Newark using community based participatory research methods and multiphase optimization strategy to test an intervention designed to reduce substance use among formerly incarcerated men. Dr. Benoit is currently a Principal Investigator with Dr. Eric Schrimshaw of the University of Central Florida on a study using sexual script theory to understand the process of sexual socialization and risk behavior in a diverse sample of young men who have sex with men. With Dr. Martin Downing of Lehman College, she is investigating the impact of childhood sexual abuse on adult substance use, health and mental health outcomes among Black and Latino gay and bisexual men.

CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 6: Developing the Human Subject Protocol and Finalizing the Application – March 23, 2020
Monday, March 23, 2020, 10:00 am-11:30 am
Location: Web Conference
Presented by: Danielle Ompad, PhD
Presentation title: CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 6: Developing the Human Subject Protocol and Finalizing the Application

Danielle Ompad will discuss the study record form including protection of human subjects, inclusion of women and minorities, inclusion of children, planned enrollment, and additional requirements for clinical trials and interventions for an NIH grant proposal.

Dr. Ompad will also present on how to finalize the application including the abstract, project narrative (PHRS), budget and budget justification, facilities and resources, biosketches, etc.

Danielle OmpadDanielle Ompad is the Deputy Director for CDUHR and Director of CDUHR’s Dissemination & Implementation Core.  She is also an Associate Professor at NYU’s School of Global Public Health.  Dr. Ompad is an infectious disease epidemiologist with extensive experience in design, conduct, and analysis of community-based cross-sectional and prospective studies.  Her research interests include illicit substance use, sexual risk behaviors, infectious diseases (e.g., HIV, HBV, HCV, HSV, and HPV), adult access to vaccines, and urban health.  She has studied HIV risk, and social determinants of that risk, among drug using populations in the US (Baltimore and New York, in particular), Ukraine, and Russia.  Dr. Ompad was a member of the Synergy Circle of the Knowledge Network on Urban Settings, a network created by WHO’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health to consider the role of urbanization in health outcomes. She has also been a consultant to the WHO and PAHO on urban health issues. She was a member of the Rockefeller Foundation-funded Roundtable for Urban Living Environment Research (RULER) group. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Urban Health and former secretary for the International Society for Urban Health.

CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 7: The NIH Peer Review Process and Grantspersonship – April 6, 2020
Monday, April 6, 2020, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm
Location: Via Zoom
Presented by: Marya Gwadz, PhD & Lloyd Goldsamt, PhD
Presentation title: CDUHR Grant Development Workshop 7: The NIH Peer Review Process and Grantspersonship

 

This workshop will cover the NIH peer review process and provide tips on best practices for putting together a grant application. In addition, the presenters will conduct mock peer reviews of NIH proposals by two early stage investigators.

Marya GwadzMarya Gwadz is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Dean for Research and Professor at the New York University Silver School of Social Work. Dr. Gwadz is an Associate Director of the Transdisciplinary Research Methods Core of the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, in which she has played a leadership role since 2005. The main focus of Dr. Gwadz’s research is the development and evaluation of potent, innovative, multi-level culturally salient interventions to address racial/ethnic and socio-economic disparities in HIV. Her work with populations in high-risk contexts spans over two decades and has focused on sub-groups such as runaway/homeless youth, young men who have sex with men (YMSM), heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, substance-using populations, low socioeconomic status populations, and persons of color living with HIV/AIDS.

Lloyd GoldsamtLloyd Goldsamt is a Senior Research Scientist at the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and an adjunct professor in NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. He has conducted NIH-funded research and community-based evaluations for the past 20 years. His primary research area is HIV and STI prevention among high-risk youth populations, including men who have sex with men, male sex workers and injection drug users. Dr. Goldsamt has conducted training and program evaluations locally and nationally, focusing on drug courts and community-based organizations working to prevent HIV and drug abuse. He is currently the Evaluator for the Brooklyn Treatment Court and an evaluator on an Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention project developing nationwide Juvenile Drug Court Learning Collaboratives. Dr. Goldsamt is also on the faculty of the Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute and a licensed clinical psychologist in New York State.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Tara McCrimmon – April 14, 2020
Tuesday, April 14, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: TBA
Presented by: Tara McCrimmon, MPH-MIA
Presentation title: Innovative HIV Prevention and Treatment Interventions among Key Populations in Kazakhstan

This presentation will provide an overview of Columbia University’s Global Health Research Center of Central Asia, and its unique role in conducting multi-level studies among people who use drugs, sex workers, and other key populations in Kazakhstan and Central Asia. It will review two HIV-focused interventions: Project Nova, a combination risk reduction and microfinance intervention for female sex workers who use drugs, and Project Bridge, which combines peer outreach, HIV testing, and case management to address losses along the HIV care continuum for people who inject drugs.

Tara MccrimmonTara McCrimmon is a research officer at Columbia University’s Social Intervention Group (SIG) and Global Health Research Center of Central Asia (GHRCCA). She has worked in the Eastern Europe and Central Asian region for over 12 years, and is currently the project director for two NIDA-funded R01 studies run out of GHRCCA’s regional office in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Ms. McCrimmon holds a dual masters degree (MPH-MIA) from Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health and School of International and Public Affairs.

CDUHR AIDS Seminar – Oni Blackstock – May 12, 2020
Tuesday, May 12, 2020, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Oni Blackstock, MD, MHS
Presentation title: Ending the HIV Epidemic: People Who Use Drugs and New York City's 90-90-90 Goals

Dr. Oni Blackstock, Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, will discuss reaching the UNAIDS 90-90-90 goals in NYC (90% of people living with HIV know their status, 90% of people diagnosed with HIV are on medication, 90% of people on medication are virally suppressed) with respect to people who use drugs. Dr. Blackstock will also review trends at the intersection of drug use and HIV in NYC and shed some light on how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting prevention, care, and harm reduction efforts.

Oni BlackstockOni Blackstock, MD, MHS, is Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control for the NYC Health Department. As Assistant Commissioner, she oversees and supervises all programmatic and administrative activities for the Bureau of HIV/AIDS. She is also a primary care physician, HIV specialist and researcher.

Dr. Blackstock’s prior research has included developing and testing interventions to improve engagement in HIV treatment and prevention services. She has an interest in community-engaged research and advocacy and has been funded by the NIH, NYS Department of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and prevention.

Dr. Blackstock received her undergraduate and her medical degrees from Harvard. She completed her primary care Internal Medicine residency and ambulatory chief residency at Montefiore/Einstein, as well as an HIV clinical fellowship at Harlem Hospital. She received a Masters of Health Sciences Research from Yale School of Medicine’s Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program.

CDUHR Presentation – Arthur Robin Williams – May 19, 2020
Tuesday, May 19, 2020, 10:00 am-11:00 am
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Arthur Robin Williams, MD, MBE
Presentation title: The Opioid Use Disorder Cascade of Care for Improving Responses to the Opioid Epidemic

Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) care often falls short of evidence based practice with highly effective FDA-approved medications. Under 25% of persons with OUD receive specialty care annually and <35% of care episodes initiate medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD). Most patients on MOUD discontinue prematurely. Yet states and the federal government struggle with data collection and reporting efforts to monitor QI efforts. The OUD Cascade of Care is a public health framework that has been promoted for organizing responses to the opioid epidemic by federal agencies such as NIDA and CDC emphasizing key stages of treatment engagement, MOUD initiation, long-term retention, and recovery.

AR WillamsArthur Robin Williams is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University Division on Substance Use Disorders, and Research Scientist, New York State Psychiatric Institute.  He attended Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs for his undergraduate degree in domestic health policy, completed his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania where he also earned a Master in Bioethics. He completed psychiatry training at NYU-Bellevue, and a NIDA funded T32 research fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at Columbia. He is funded by a NIDA K23 and R21. His K23 award addresses the addiction treatment gap and systems-based practice to improve quality of care for the treatment of Opioid Use Disorder through the development of an OUD Cascade of Care. His work on the Cascade of Care has been invited as expert testimony to the NIH HEAL Initiative, NIH HEAL JCOIN, NIDA CTN, APA, and SAMHSA CSAT. For this work, he has been awarded the American Psychiatry Association (APA) Health Services Researcher of the Year, Early Career Scholar (2019). He is also the PI of a NIDA R21 entitled, “Medical Marijuana Program Participation and Changes in Controlled Substance Use.”

Dr. Williams has published ~25 first authored publications and book chapters addressing the opioid epidemic and improving quality of care through the OUD Cascade. He has served as a content expert for the National Council for Behavioral Health for a 6-state learning collaborative to improve the uptake and evidence-based use of MOUD (2015-2016) and has developed symposia at the AAAP and ASAM. He also serves on the APA Expert Work Group: quality of life outcomes for SUD treatment, facilitated by Mathematica (2019), the APA Technical Expert Panel: quality measure development for OUD with NCQA (2019-2021), and on a National Quality Forum (NQF) opioid measure development group (2019-2020). He has also published retrospective survey studies with Bellevue clinic buprenorphine patients in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and of clinical trajectories of patients on MOUD with buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone with a retrospective survey of xr-naltrexone outpatients.

DPA & CDUHR: Research for Policy Change – May 29, 2020
Friday, May 29, 2020, 9:30 am-12:30 pm
Location: Zoom webinar
Presented by: Panel discussion
Presentation title: Advocates Panel & Media and Policymakers Panel

The Drug Policy Alliance and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) are co-hosting a one-day workshop for researchers to discuss best practices to make drug research accessible to the public and policymakers. Join us for one, or both sessions.

Advocates Panel

When do advocates use research in their advocacy work? And when don’t they? Drug policy advocates who work to change local, state, and/or federal policy will discuss how researchers can make their findings accessible and useful to advocacy campaigns.

dpa-advocates

Panelists:

  • Queen Adesuyi, Drug Policy Alliance
  • Jasmine Budnella, VOCAL-NY
  • Lynn Paltrow, National Advocates for Pregnant Women
  • Daniel Raymond, Harm Reduction Coalition
  • gabriel sayegh, Katal Center for Health, Equity, and Justice

 


Media and Policymakers Panel

Journalists who cover drugs and health policy-related issues will discuss the media landscape, their decisions and challenges around covering research, and best practices for engaging with them. A staffer from a NYC Council Member’s office will describe how officials find and utilize research, and how researchers can make their work accessible to elected officials in order to affect policy change.

dpa-media-policymaker

Panelists:

  • Elizabeth Adams, Legislative Director for NYC Councilmember Stephen Levin
  • Sessi Kuwabara Blanchard, Filter
  • Maia Szalavitz, Independent neuroscience journalist